REORIENT
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REORIENT is a magazine celebrating contemporary Middle Eastern arts and culture // edited by Joobin Bekhrad

Persian carpet swimming pool … if only our office had one! #persian #persia #carpet #pool #iran #iranian #design

Persian carpet swimming pool … if only our office had one! #persian #persia #carpet #pool #iran #iranian #design

REORIENT in the ArtInternational Istanbul 2014 booklet #istanbul #turkey #turkish #turk #turkiye #qajar #iran #iranian #persia #persian

REORIENT in the ArtInternational Istanbul 2014 booklet #istanbul #turkey #turkish #turk #turkiye #qajar #iran #iranian #persia #persian

The number of visitors to Rumi’s iconic, conical green mausoleum reaches its peak during the annual Shab-e Arusi (Persian for ‘Wedding Night’), which takes place between December 10 – 17 to mark the mystic’s death, or, alternatively, his union with his Beloved in 1207. Unlike most other Muslim festivals whose dates are determined by the lunar calendar, the Turks have fixed the date of his death as December 17 in the Gregorian calendar. Rumi’s shrine attracts not only Muslim visitors, but people of many other faiths from around the world as well. During the festival, big sema ceremonies (recitations of Koranic verses, along with music and whirling) held in a specially-built building, as well as more informal musical gatherings and sessions in hotels and other venues throughout the city.
Read the full article here

The number of visitors to Rumi’s iconic, conical green mausoleum reaches its peak during the annual Shab-e Arusi (Persian for ‘Wedding Night’), which takes place between December 10 – 17 to mark the mystic’s death, or, alternatively, his union with his Beloved in 1207. Unlike most other Muslim festivals whose dates are determined by the lunar calendar, the Turks have fixed the date of his death as December 17 in the Gregorian calendar. Rumi’s shrine attracts not only Muslim visitors, but people of many other faiths from around the world as well. During the festival, big sema ceremonies (recitations of Koranic verses, along with music and whirling) held in a specially-built building, as well as more informal musical gatherings and sessions in hotels and other venues throughout the city.

Read the full article here

Iran, 1970 (a photo taken for the UK’s Honey Magazine) #iran #iranian #persia #persian #fashion #style #mosque)

Iran, 1970 (a photo taken for the UK’s Honey Magazine) #iran #iranian #persia #persian #fashion #style #mosque)

Leed Zeebleen #ledzeppelin #ledzep #arab #arabic #lebanon #baalbek #vintage #robertplant #jimmypage

Leed Zeebleen #ledzeppelin #ledzep #arab #arabic #lebanon #baalbek #vintage #robertplant #jimmypage

Brigitte Bardot and a friend … (if anyone knows the details of this image, let us know!) #arab #arabic #desert #camel #brigittebardot

Brigitte Bardot and a friend … (if anyone knows the details of this image, let us know!) #arab #arabic #desert #camel #brigittebardot

This week on REORIENT - the musical history of New York City’s Middle Eastern community in the early 20th century and the story of the Syrian musician Naim Karakand, one of its all-but-forgotten virtuosos … 
Read the full article here

This week on REORIENT - the musical history of New York City’s Middle Eastern community in the early 20th century and the story of the Syrian musician Naim Karakand, one of its all-but-forgotten virtuosos … 

Read the full article here

Qajar Zippo lighter

Qajar Zippo lighter

Cher and Lenin (sans tete) in Yerevan, Armenia, 1993 #armenia #armenian #lenin #cher #yerevan

Cher and Lenin (sans tete) in Yerevan, Armenia, 1993 #armenia #armenian #lenin #cher #yerevan

‘In 2007, we used to perform in the university’s theatre department. We were never guided by style; we were drawn by the music itself at a specific moment – we’re all music freaks! We all fancy bands like Lhasa, Zaz, Radiohead, and many others, but what brought us all together was Balkan Gypsy music. Sometimes Mahyar and I play gushehs (melodies of the dastgah system of classical Persian music), while Kaveh and I rapidly move about to a waltz, and Hesam starts a 6/8 tempo (commonly used in traditional Persian music as well as Iranian pop music) based on what I’m playing on the clarinet. As I mentioned before, the music itself guides us’
Read the full article here

In 2007, we used to perform in the university’s theatre department. We were never guided by style; we were drawn by the music itself at a specific moment – we’re all music freaks! We all fancy bands like Lhasa, Zaz, Radiohead, and many others, but what brought us all together was Balkan Gypsy music. Sometimes Mahyar and I play gushehs (melodies of the dastgah system of classical Persian music), while Kaveh and I rapidly move about to a waltz, and Hesam starts a 6/8 tempo (commonly used in traditional Persian music as well as Iranian pop music) based on what I’m playing on the clarinet. As I mentioned before, the music itself guides us’

Read the full article here

#orient #orientalism #architecture #design #clouds #orientalist

#orient #orientalism #architecture #design #clouds #orientalist

#arab #arabic #niqab #design

#arab #arabic #niqab #design

USA #arab #arabic #usa #passport

USA #arab #arabic #usa #passport

#orientalist #orientalism #bellydance #bellydancer #vintage #style #fashion

#orientalist #orientalism #bellydance #bellydancer #vintage #style #fashion

Above all, Hadid’s film is one that urges contemplation, and through the director’s cinematic approach, viewers are provided ample opportunity to reflect on, and engage with the panoply of emotions sumptuously and evocatively portrayed on screen. Perhaps most moving are the film’s final scenes that take place within and outside a Baghdad morgue, which Zakaria visits in the faint hope of at least being able to identify his brother’s corpse, should it be there. Aside from the washing of blood, the echoes of footsteps, and intermittent recitations of the Koran, nothing else is to be heard. On the floor of the morgue, corpses lie scattered under pink sheets; the chilling bird’s-eye-view shot of the scene helps one realise, to a small degree, the number of lives claimed by the most recent Iraq war, and their concealment serves as a poignant reference to the anonymous fashion in which the victims of this war are often portrayed: that is, not as individuals, but as bodies and statistics. As he stands hopelessly outside the morgue under a relentless sun, his coarse linen shirt soaked to the core, an incessant throng of black, shapeless figures brush past him, eerily evoking the imagery and feel of Shirin Neshat’s film, Women Without Men, as well as her Women of Allah series of photographs. Yet again, the angel of history alights with mouth agape and wings akimbo, looking in horror at the past: The storm irresistibly propels him into the future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward.
Read the full article here

Above all, Hadid’s film is one that urges contemplation, and through the director’s cinematic approach, viewers are provided ample opportunity to reflect on, and engage with the panoply of emotions sumptuously and evocatively portrayed on screen. Perhaps most moving are the film’s final scenes that take place within and outside a Baghdad morgue, which Zakaria visits in the faint hope of at least being able to identify his brother’s corpse, should it be there. Aside from the washing of blood, the echoes of footsteps, and intermittent recitations of the Koran, nothing else is to be heard. On the floor of the morgue, corpses lie scattered under pink sheets; the chilling bird’s-eye-view shot of the scene helps one realise, to a small degree, the number of lives claimed by the most recent Iraq war, and their concealment serves as a poignant reference to the anonymous fashion in which the victims of this war are often portrayed: that is, not as individuals, but as bodies and statistics. As he stands hopelessly outside the morgue under a relentless sun, his coarse linen shirt soaked to the core, an incessant throng of black, shapeless figures brush past him, eerily evoking the imagery and feel of Shirin Neshat’s film, Women Without Men, as well as her Women of Allah series of photographs. Yet again, the angel of history alights with mouth agape and wings akimbo, looking in horror at the past: The storm irresistibly propels him into the future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward.

Read the full article here